Gone is Jean-Luc Godard – the symbol of the French New Wave

French director Jean-Luc Godard, who was a key figure in the Nouvelle Vague, the film movement that revolutionized cinema in the late 1950s and 1960s, has died aged 91, French newspaper Liberation reports.

He is known for his radical and rebellious style, at first glance improvised, as well as for his unwavering character to cut into the wounds of French society from the 60s to the present day.

Godard made his mark with a string of political films from the 1960s, but in recent years his career has seen a revival with films such as Film Socialisme and Farewell to Language.

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Jean-Luc Godard: The permanent revolutionary at 90

He is a pioneer: innovative, radical left, political. Not interested in conventions and honors. As a director, he breaks the previous boundaries in cinema and opens a whole new era. Creates unprecedented images, introduces revolutionary use of the camera.

If the mass student protests in 1968 were the visible expression of the demand for social and political change in France, then the new film movements in Europe had already begun to predict this rebellion.

Jean-Luc Godard was born in Paris on December 3, 1930. He grew up on the streets and corners of Paris. At the time, Sartre ruled Paris with existentialism and its adjacent cafes, restaurants and bars.

Made his first film in 1954 after traveling with his father across North and South America. After 1954, he participated in various ways in the filming of most of Truffaut’s films. He writes articles for “Cahiers du CinĂ©ma”.

Godard says:

“I grew up in a bourgeois family and one day I ran away. I came to the world of film production instead of going down the road of marijuana and LSD. Then I discovered that the world of cinema is the most bourgeois family I’ve ever seen.”

Among the most impressive films he created are “To the Last Breath” (1960), “The Little Soldier” (1960), “A Woman is a Woman” (1961), “To Live Your Life” (1962), “Contempt” ( 1963), “Alphaville” (1965), “Crazy Pierrot” (1965), “The Chinese Woman” (1967) and others.

France is losing a “national treasure” with the death of director Jean-Luc Godard, the godfather of the “new wave” in French cinema, the country’s president Emmanuel Macron said, quoted by Reuters, BTA reports.

On Twitter, he described Godard as a phenomenon in French cinema, who created contemporary, free art.

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