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After nearly 80 years of separation, a World War II veteran met his sweetheart

A 99-year-old World War II veteran has reunited with his sweetheart after nearly 80 years of separation.

The story of Reg Pye and 92-year-old Huguette is told by the BBC, broadcast by BBC.

They met during the Second World War in France in the summer of 1944. He was only 20 years old and she was only 14 years old.

Their meeting is short, but nevertheless the memory of it remains for a lifetime. For almost 80 years, he still keeps a photo of her in his wallet.

The British veteran recalls their first meeting.

“A van stopped next to me. It was run by a guy called Geordie, and he offered me a can of sardines. There was also a slice of bread spread with margarine and jam. We walked around and then headed back to the van. There I saw a girl in a white dress. She didn’t want sardines, so I suggested she get the slice with jam,” he said.

Reg doesn’t remember if Huguette took the slice, but he does remember that after they met, she crossed the street and went into the church. The next day, Reg looks in the plate where the slice was and sees that she left her picture.

“I’ve kept the photo in my wallet ever since,” said Reg.

At their meeting after nearly 80 years, Reg served Huguette a slice with butter and jam.

“Here’s a jam sandwich,” he said with a smile as he greeted Huguette at a nursing home in northern France.

“Nice to see you again after such a long time. We’ve grown old, but we’re still the same,” Huguette smiled.

All this time, Reg has been trying to find his beloved, but without success. Both were married, he had a son and she had three children.

“She’s still alive. All this time I thought you must have died already because times were very hard when we were young,” said Reg.

After their conversation, the two embraced, and Reg kissed Huguette on the cheek, and she asked him if they were going to get married.

Reg agreed, and Huguette promised to “dump” her current boyfriend in the nursing home and marry him.

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